SyTrue will enable NotePath Smart Chart to make the most of medical records and improve the efficiency and accuracy of clinical document reviews and analysis.STATELINE, NEVADA, UNITED STATES, January 12, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ — ChartWise Medical Systems, Inc. (ChartWise), a computer-assisted Clinical Documentation Integrity (CDI) company, selects SyTrue, a leading provider of clinical Natural Language Processing (NLP) to improve accuracy, efficiency, and quality of medical record reviews and analysis in client hospitals.
ChartWise integrates healthcare’s most-advanced Natural Language Processing Operating System, NLP OS™ into its NotePath™ AI-based chart review system, an innovative documentation improvement product released earlier this year. NotePath will leverage NLP OS™ to mine structured and unstructured medical records, extracting key insights alerting to clinical evidence and advice regarding diagnoses, suggestions to improve the documentation, Risk-Adjustment Factors, HCCs, Patient Safety Indicators, co-morbidities, lab result interpretation, and other information.

“The ability for SyTrue to extract accurate data across the continuum of care is critical to automate CDI. When you combine the structured data with ChartWise’s workflow and knowledge base, providers are able to realize real savings,” said Kyle Silvestro, Founder, and CEO of SyTrue. “We’re looking forward to continuing to provide ChartWise with the most accurate NLP Platform commercially available that will help improve the quality and efficiency of their clients’ clinical documentation.”

Providers often struggle with incomplete or inaccurate documentation resulting in incorrect billing, reimbursement, and quality reporting. With the ability to mine unstructured and structured clinical records using NLP OS™, ChartWise can prompt CDI specialists to improve both the efficiency and accuracy of documentation to obtain appropriate reimbursements, reduce claims denials and improve quality scores.

“SyTrue’s NLP OS is a standout leader in the clinical field,” said Jon Elion, Founder and Chief Innovation Officer of ChartWise. “SyTrue met all of our requirements for first-rate NLP processing, the ability to handle high volumes of unstructured data, and a remarkable technical support team to foster ongoing collaboration.”

About SyTrue
SyTrue is built to fix our broken workflows within the healthcare system by automating healthcare’s most onerous tasks; delivering increased productivity, reduced cost and increased revenue to Health Plans and Service Providers. Health organizations consume hundreds of millions to billions of pages of clinical documentation annually. Most of this documentation is locked in unstructured formats like PDF, TIFF, DOC, etc., preventing the insights contained within them from being widely consumed and distributed to the organization. This blocks your enterprise from enjoying the exponential benefits of those insights. SyTrue is designed to solve this problem. We can consume billions of pages of clinical documentation and publish accurate insights throughout the organization providing a new enterprise view that can drive 20 different objectives rather than just one. SyTrue is used by National Health Plans to extract meaningful insights to make clinical decisions more efficient, affordable, and effective.

About ChartWise
ChartWise Medical Systems, Inc., based in Wakefield, RI, is a healthcare software firm and the developer of ChartWise CDI, a web-based solution for Computer-Assisted Clinical Documentation Improvement. ChartWise CDI’s built-in clinical intelligence and efficient workflow assists physicians and clinical documentation specialists with increased completeness and accuracy of documentation, risk-adjustment, reimbursement and quality scores. Developed by renowned physician Jon Elion, M.D., ChartWise CDI is the only clinical documentation software that translates clinical language used by physicians into accurate diagnostic language required for documentation and reimbursement. ChartWise CDI has provided a positive ROI between five to eighteen times the cost of the software for every client who has used ChartWise CDI. ChartWise was recognized in the 2016 and 2017 Inc. 5000 List as one of America’s fastest-growing private companies, placing first among all Rhode Island-based businesses on the list each year. ChartWise has also been a KLAS award winner for the CDI software category for three consecutive years. For more information, visit www.chartwisemed.com.

Innovaccer, Inc., a leading healthcare technology company, announces its partnership with SyTrue, a leading provider of clinical data extraction, to generate robust, actionable insights from healthcare data. 

The partnership allows Innovaccer to leverage healthcare’s most-advanced Natural Language Processing Operating System, NLP OSTM, and dive deep into clinical data,  extracting valuable details about patient health journeys. 

The integration of SyTrue’s proprietary NLP OS with Innovaccer’s FHIR-enabled Data Activation Platform will empower healthcare organizations to identify diagnosis codes and Hierarchical Condition Categories (HCC) from patient care progress notes and other unstructured texts. With the ability to gain insights from the unstructured datasets, providers can improve the accuracy of patient risk scores. 

“Creating a longitudinal record is paramount to enabling an intelligent journey throughout our complex healthcare system. Too often, crucial patient data is not included as part of the complete medical record because it is locked in faxes, portable document formats (PDFs) and other unstructured documentation. To unlock the insights contained within these files is expensive and time-consuming,”  says Kyle Silvestro, CEO at SyTrue.  “Our partnership with Innovaccer will reduce the time and cost to create intelligent and comprehensive insights which will significantly enhance the patient journey.”

SyTrue’s NLP OS will empower Innovaccer’s data platform to semantically search, identify, and discover key elements from medical records across the organization, delivering relevant, actionable insights at the moment of care. NLP OS will allow Innovaccer to help its clients extract details about lab records, medications, vital signs, diagnoses, and other elements from structured and unstructured sources to successfully meet quality requirements.

The partnership will allow Innovaccer’s  customer provider organizations to understand their patients’ medical records in a more comprehensive manner and optimize reimbursement through advanced coding, smart cohort identification, and unstructured data normalization. 

“Generating insights from valuable data that remains hidden in unstructured data has always been a challenging task. These details provide great insights into the patient’s care journey, but most of the time, they go unnoticed,” says Abhinav Shashank, CEO at Innovaccer. “With our partnership with SyTrue, we are expanding our capability to make the best use of this crucial data and help healthcare organizations to care as one.”

About SyTrue

SyTrue is built to fix our broken workflows within the healthcare system by automating healthcare’s most onerous tasks; delivering increased productivity, reduced cost and increased revenue to Health Plans and Service Providers.  Health organizations consume hundreds of millions to billions of pages of clinical documentation annually.  Most of this documentation is locked in unstructured formats like PDF, TIFF, DOC, etc., preventing the insights contained within them from being widely consumed and distributed to the organization.  This blocks your enterprise from enjoying the exponential benefits of those insights.  SyTrue is designed to solve this problem.  We can consume billions of pages of clinical documentation and publish accurate insights throughout the organization providing a new enterprise view that can drive 20 different objectives rather than just one.  SyTrue is used by National Health Plans to extract meaningful insights to make clinical decisions more efficient, affordable, and effective.

Kyle Silvestro

SyTrue, Inc.

530-897-0220

About Innovaccer

Innovaccer, Inc. is a leading San Francisco-based healthcare technology company committed to making a powerful and enduring difference in the way care is delivered. The company leverages artificial intelligence and analytics to automate routine workflows and reduce manual overhead to facilitate more person-centered care. Its KLAS-recognized products have been deployed all over the U.S. across more than 1,000 locations, enabling more than 37,000 providers to transform care delivery and work collaboratively with payers. Innovaccer’s FHIR-enabled Data Activation Platform has been successfully implemented with healthcare institutions, private health plans, and government organizations. By using the connected care framework, Innovaccer has unified records for more than 24 million members and generated more than $600M in savings.

For more information, please visit innovaccer.com.

“You only know who is naked when the tide goes out,” Warren Buffett famously said of the nation’s businesses when markets tank. For the nation’s information systems, the opposite is true. You see their weaknesses when they are inundated by a tidal wave of data.

A case in point is the information infrastructure of the American healthcare system, which will play a critical role in understanding and battling the COVID-19 pandemic. Just as the capacity of some national health systems have been overwhelmed by the number of COVID-19 cases—most notably in Italy—healthcare providers and professionals in the U.S. run the risk of being overwhelmed with data because the information infrastructure of the American healthcare system is tragically flawed and unable to contend with the immense wave of data being generated by the disease and its aftermath. 

The impact of this wave of data will be felt by hospitals, insurers, research institutions, and the myriad government agencies charged with analyzing and responding to the crisis. Moreover, these institutions will be tasked with conceiving new protections for society against recurrent outbreaks of COVID-19 and other future epidemics. RELATED:   New COVID-19 Community Vulnerability Map Uses Social Determinants of Health to Identify Populations At Greater Risk

According to FEMA training on communications during emergencies, information can be as important to people as food and water. There are actions that governments (federal, state, and local) can take in cooperation with the private sector to greatly improve our medical information infrastructure. But these governments must move quickly.

At the heart of the problem is the electronic medical record (EMR). It is the nemesis of doctors who have long complained about their hours spent each day on data entry. Once you increase front-line physicians’ caseloads by an order of two or more, it becomes unclear how these clinicians will have time to both treat patients and record their records electronically.

Moreover, electronic medical records were built to track and bill procedures, not generate the insights experts will need such as new symptoms, comorbidities, risk factors, and geographic locations. In fact, with the exception of health plans, current records are unable to track a patient over time, documenting their symptoms and visits at different locations. It is this “longitudinal” story of a patient that is critical in tracking an epidemic.   

But that is hardly the end of it. Large numbers of medical records are actually a Tower of Babel that comes in many forms: Word documents, pdfs, XML, JSON, and HL7. With 4 billion electronic medical records currently generated each year in the United States, insurance companies employ armies of workers to translate a fraction of these documents. The documents must be turned into a common language and formatted so that they can be organized, read, and analyzed. Amid a health crisis, timely digitization, dissemination, and summarization of such data can literally mean the difference between life and death for some patients. 

In the best of times, extracting key information and insights from large numbers of records is difficult and inefficient, taking weeks or months. Now imagine crucial records regarding COVID-19 patients suddenly pouring into the electronic medical record system by the millions. As currently constituted, our records system is difficult to scale. The quick analysis would be impossible, and many institutions are likely to be overwhelmed. 

Finally, there is the issue of interoperability. Even two hospitals that use a medical records solution from the same provider cannot talk to one another. Researchers looking for key insights from medical records would not only need to learn from hospital records, but they would also need to sift through the electronic records of government programs like Medicare and Medicaid. Like the hospitals, most of these institutions will be unable to easily share information with one another or with researchers.

To counter the potential medical information crisis, the US federal government could act swiftly by doing the following:

Use the latest advances in artificial intelligence, machine learning, and natural language processing to normalize unstructured medical records into standard terminologies such as ICD10, ICD10 PCS, SNOMED, LOINC, RxNorm, CPT, or NCI to ensure interoperability and portability of this data. Thus, they could be machine-readable and quickly analyzed for key insights.  

  • Permit and encourage physicians and other medical providers to replace the manual entry of patient data into electronic medical records. Physicians would make audio recordings of their notes on their smartphones during patient visits. These audio records could then be sent to a transcriptionist who could type the encounters into unstructured clinical documents.  Once those encounters are documented organizations can leverage AI, ML, and NLP to convert the document into interoperable data.  
  • Longer-term, task the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the largest payer of health bills and the repository of the largest store of medical records in the nation, with creating a national health information platform. Such a platform would be both interoperable (so researchers and institutions can talk with one another) and include the records of private plans that are longitudinal (so researchers can track patient cases over time). The new platform should be made transparent so that physicians, medical researchers, and institutions, both private and public, can access them. 

To be sure, some institutions are now providing good information to the public and taking steps in the right direction. The Centers for Disease Control is doing the best it can in tracking and analyzing the pandemic based on the limited data provided by local and state health departments. EPIC, one of the two large suppliers of electronic medical records, recently announced that it is issuing a new travel screening questionnaire to its customers to help identify people more likely to be infected by the virus.

But in light of the speed of contagion of COVID-19 and the broad populations at risk, these kinds of actions are nowhere near enough. What we need is greater recognition of the critical place of our medical information in our nation’s infrastructure, and a swift and highly coordinated public-private effort led by the federal government to make it stronger.  

About Kyle Silvestro

Kyle Silvestro is an Adjunct Faculty Member of Singularity University focusing on Medical Informatics, AI and Machine learning. He is also Chief Executive Officer and founder of SyTrue, a healthcare information technology company in Chico, California.

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